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A girl in every port or airport?!?!?

Now that someone wants to learn more about my dating life in my travels, might as well write more about this topic.

A man on a journey is likely to meet women at every literal step. There is no destination that I have been that I never been introduced to a lady. Well most of these were purely social and for some, I had remained in touch for a while and then lost touch. Perhaps she moved residence. Some I am still in touch after all these years and mileage miles. I am so elated to learn that she had found a husband and is happily married with kids.

As for Ms Sydneysider, she and I are still in touch. She is of Greek and Filipino origin and is now a barrister having been admitted to the New South Wales Bar. She is involved with the rights of immigrants in Australia. She was the one who recemtly updated me about the case of Mrs Vivian Young Alvarez, the Australian national of Filipino origin mistakenly deported by Australian immigration. I told her that I am still interested in Australian issues.


As for serious entanglements on the road (not of the Imperial kind :) ) well I do have a few. In San Francisco, I was seriously involved with a medical student at USF and we did date. Well I proceeded to Monterey and we were in touch for a while by post. This was before the advent of e-mail for the masses (e-mail can only be had in a few university libraries). I have kept all her letters and she did become a doctor. We lost touch for a few years. In 2002 in Philadelphia airport, our paths crossed once more. She was on to Tallahasee to celebrate her parents' wedding anniversary with two small children in tow.

What about casual entanglements? That is the traveller's lot at times

Well that's the lot of the wanderer. A a few lines from the song "I still call Australia Home" describes really how I feel about my travels and the women whose paths crossed with mine.

"I've been to cities that never close down
From New York to Rome and old London Town
But I realise something I've always known"

"I'm always travelling - I love being free
And so I keep leaving the sun and the sea
But my heart lies waiting, over the foam"

"All the sons and daughters, spinning 'round the world
Away from their family and friends
But as the world gets older, and colder
Its good to know where your journey ends.
And some day we'll all be together once more
When all the ships come back to the shore"

Probably I will really get permanently entangled soon by another traveler like myself!

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