Skip to main content

On the news very recently

The Philippine Daily Inquirer reports that President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo plans to go back to teaching. The blurb quoted Mrs Arroyo's son Mikey.

I never had Mrs Arroyo teach me economics (only the indomitable Winnie Monsod). But in the words of Sister Lucy (the nun I helped in teaching science to indigenous Australian kids when I was doing my PhD in Oz) I would say "She would make a good teacher!'

Being a prof myself I immediately realised that Mrs Arroyo ran the country as if she were managing a rowdy freshie class. The freshie prof should be able to 1) Throw a bit of temper trantrums some of the time, 2) be imperious , 3) shut up psuedointellectuals and "philosophers" and 4) know what he/she's talking about and come to class prepared.

Mrs Arroyo for all her faults was extremely good at this. She would make a good PhD supervisor!

As for Mikey, the only way he could shed his "mama's boy" image is to do an act of rebellion that all normal teenagers do.

Statements like this

"I’m already near 40-years old and on my second term, and I have two kids. I suppose my mother would give me my independence”

don't help! I have a tip for Mikey. You have to match your mother's intellectual acuity!

Yesterday Rotary International had a letter to the editor asking readers not to link Joc Joc Bolante's name with the club.

The letter says

"While we acknowledge that Bolante distinguished himself as a Rotary officer, it is unfair to consistently link his name to Rotary in an attempt to demean the international organization. If the media were truly aware of what Rotary is all about, they would surely realize that linking Rotary to Bolante is hardly fair to all concerned."

and continues

"As Bolante has not yet had his day in court and undergone due process, the imputations of guilt and scurrilous behavior on his person are most unfounded and uncalled for and do not serve the interest of justice and fair play."

We have to disagree. I don't think reporters are demeaning Rotary at all. What they are saying is fact. Rotary International has stated it. Bolante distinguished himself in the club.

Also the imputations of guilt and scurrilous behaviour on Bolante's person isn't unfounded at all. If it were, why did US immigration detain him for two years?

While we leave it to the courts to make a public judgement on Bolante's innocent or guilt, that never stops people from making their own private judgement on his character. Rotary is a private organisation. Nothing stops it from making its own judgement of Bolante.

This is what Rotary fails to grasp. Washing its hands of Bolante hardly makes the club more respectable. Unless it expels Joc Joc from the roster, it has just to live with the fact that people will link Rotary with Bolante.

C'mon Rotary! Even employers have notices saying so and so employee is no longer connected with them. They need not even say what the reason was but it is sure that the employee no longer holds up to the company's standard.

Isn't the Four Way Test Rotary's golden standard? Does Bolante still live up to that?


Popular posts from this blog

President Manuel Luis Quezon's Code of Ethics

Being a denizen of Kyusi, in honour of the man who gave my city its name and for being the most colourful prez the Philippines ever had, I have the pleasure to post Manuel L Quezon's Code of Ethics on his birthday. Let us profit from the wisdom of the Kastila.

1. Have Faith in the Divine Providence that guides the destinies of men and nations.

2. Love your country for it is the home of your people, the seat of your affection and the source of your happiness and well-being. It's defense is your primary duty. Be ready to sacrifice and die for it if necessary.

3. Respect the Constitution which is the expression of your sovereign will. The government is your government. It has been established for your safety and welfare. Obey the laws and see that they are observed by all and that public officials comply with their duties.

4. Pay your taxes willingly and promptly. Citizenship implies not only rights but obligations.

5. Safeguard the purity of suffrage and abide by the decisions of the…

Simoun's lamp has been lit, finally.. not by one but by the many!

"So often have we been haunted by the spectre of subversion which, with some fostering, has come to be a positive and real being, whose very name steals our serenity and makes us commit the greatest blunders... If before the reality, instead of changing the fear of one is increased, and the confusion of the other is exacerbated, then they must be left in the hands of time..."
Dr Jose Rizal "To the Filipino People and their Government"
Jose Rizal dominates the Luneta, which is sacred to the Philippine nation as a place of martyrdom. And many perhaps all of those executed in the Luneta, with the exception of the three Filipino secular priests martyred in 1872, have read Rizal's El Filibusterismo. Dr Rizal's second novel is a darker and more sinister one that its prequel but has much significance across the century and more after it was published for it preaches the need for revolution with caveats,  which are when the time is right and who will instigate it.

Flame trees in bloom

The hottest summer courtesy of El Nino in at least 10 years gave runners and walkers in the University of the Philippines Diliman campus a visual treat. This year the flame trees Delonix regia are in full bloom!
In past summers it wasn't as hot and dry so the trees did not shed their leaves and few blooms were produced.
It is the tropical version of the Japanese Hanami or the Cherry blossom viewing season. While Hanami tells us the fragile impermanence of beauty, the flame tree hanami tells us that summer burns but soon it will all be over.